Looking Back

Thoughts on Early Music Performance

Marco da Gagliano's La Dafne (1608)

Named for the village outside of Florence from which he hailed, Marco da Gagliano was expected to take holy orders and thus received his early training with a religious confraternity, later with Luca Bati. In 1602, he was engaged as an instructor of singing at San Lorenzo, but in 1607 found himself at the court of Mantua, where he wrote his version of Dafne, which was staged that same year along with Monteverdi’s Orfeo. In 1609 he returned to Florence as maestro di capella at the Compagnia dell’Arcangelo Rafaello where he had trained in his youth, and shortly thereafter he assumed the position held earlier by his teacher Bati, maestro di capella at the Medici court. Gagliano is noted princip

TC Early Music Festival hosts Marco da Gagliano's La Dafne (1608)

Named for the village outside of Florence from which he hailed, Marco da Gagliano was expected to take holy orders and thus received his early training with a religious confraternity, later with Luca Bati. In 1602, he was engaged as an instructor of singing at San Lorenzo, but in 1607 found himself at the court of Mantua, where he wrote his version of Dafne, which was staged that same year along with Monteverdi’s Orfeo. In 1609 he returned to Florence as maestro di capella at the Compagnia dell’Arcangelo Rafaello where he had trained in his youth, and shortly thereafter he assumed the position held earlier by his teacher Bati, maestro di capella at the Medici court. Gagliano is noted princip

Embracing the past. Enriching the future.

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